Human ear - Anatomy, Hearing, Balance (2024)

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Summarize Outer ear References

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Written by

Joseph E. Hawkins Emeritus Professor of Otolaryngology (Physiological Acoustics), Medical School, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Editor of Otophysiology.

Joseph E. Hawkins

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Outer ear

The most-striking differences between the human ear and the ears of other mammals are in the structure of the outermost part, the auricle. In humans the auricle is an almost rudimentary, usually immobile shell that lies close to the side of the head. It consists of a thin plate of yellow elastic cartilage covered by closely adherent skin. The cartilage is molded into clearly defined hollows, ridges, and furrows that form an irregular shallow funnel. The deepest depression, which leads directly to the external auditory canal, or acoustic meatus, is called the concha. It is partly covered by two small projections, the tonguelike tragus in front and the antitragus behind. Above the tragus a prominent ridge, the helix, arises from the floor of the concha and continues as the incurved rim of the upper portion of the auricle. An inner, concentric ridge, the antihelix, surrounds the concha and is separated from the helix by a furrow, the scapha, also called the fossa of the helix. In some ears a little prominence known as Darwin’s tubercle is seen along the upper, posterior portion of the helix; it is the vestige of the folded-over point of the ear of a remote human ancestor. The lobule, the fleshy lower part of the auricle, is the only area of the outer ear that contains no cartilage. The auricle also has several small rudimentary muscles, which fasten it to the skull and scalp. In most individuals these muscles do not function, although some persons can voluntarily activate them to produce limited movements. The external auditory canal is a slightly curved tube that extends inward from the floor of the concha and ends blindly at the tympanic membrane. In its outer third, the wall of the canal consists of cartilage; in its inner two-thirds, of bone. The entire length of the passage (24 mm, or almost 1 inch) is lined with skin, which also covers the outer surface of the tympanic membrane. Fine hairs directed outward and modified sweat glands that produce earwax, or cerumen, line the canal and discourage insects from entering it.

Human ear - Anatomy, Hearing, Balance (2024)

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